Son of Man

The title “Son of Man” is a literal translation of the Hebrew phrase ben-adam. In Hebrew, the name Adam means “man.” As such, the biblical expression, son of man, like the modern phrase, human being, applies to anyone and everyone. C.S. Lewis captures this beautifully in the Chronicles of Narnia, where he refers to human beings as the sons of Adam and the daughters of Eve. But if everyone is an ordinary son of Adam, why does Matthew elevate “Son of Man” as a unique title for Jesus? The answer lies in examining biblical parallels that are part and parcel with Matthew’s proclamation of the Kingdom: the elevation of the title “shepherd” to a kingly status, of weakness to a sign of God’s might, and the crucifixion to a symbol of victory. Richard and Fr. Marc discuss Matthew 17:9-13. Episode 327 Matthew 17:9-13; Music: Pilot Error by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4216-pilot-error License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

The title “Son of Man” is a literal translation of the Hebrew phrase ben-adam. In Hebrew, the name Adam means “man.” As such, the biblical expression, son of man, like the modern phrase, human being, applies to anyone and everyone. C.S. Lewis captures this beautifully in the Chronicles of Narnia, where he refers to human beings as the sons of Adam and the daughters of Eve. 

But if everyone is an ordinary son of Adam, why does Matthew elevate “Son of Man” as a unique title for Jesus? 

The answer lies in examining biblical parallels that are part and parcel with Matthew’s proclamation of the Kingdom: the elevation of the title “shepherd” to a kingly status, of weakness to a sign of God’s might, and the crucifixion to a symbol of victory. 

Richard and Fr. Marc discuss Matthew 17:9-13.

Episode 327 Matthew 17:9-13; Music: Pilot Error by Kevin MacLeod

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